As a kitchen floor surface, linoleum offers a huge variety of designs and colors. Linoleum is often compared to vinyl in terms of its durability and suitability for heavy traffic. Even better, linoleum is antibacterial and antistatic, making it hygienic and easy to clean. Furthermore, linoleum floors are soft and comfortable underfoot, which makes it a great surface for committed cooks.

Linoleum Flooring Essentials

What Is It? Although linoleum was originally manufactured from natural materials including solidified linseed oil, resin, wood flour, limestone, and pigments, modern linoleum has largely been replaced as a floor covering by polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which is often colloquially but incorrectly called linoleum or lino. PVC has similar flexibility and durability to linoleum, but also has greater brightness and translucency, and is relatively less flammable.

Durability: Linoleum makes a strong kitchen floor surface and can stand up to heavy traffic and spills.

Cleaning and Maintenance: Wipe up spills immediately. Sweep, dust, or vacuum regularly, and occasionally wipe the surface with a damp mop or cloth. Clean with a mop and ph-neutral cleanser, and buff as needed (often only every few years).

What to Consider When Choosing Linoleum Kitchen Flooring

Linoleum comes in several forms:

Sheets- Usually two meters wide, can be sleek and seamless or accented with inlays and borders.

Tiles – Come in several sizes and can be arranged in nearly any design, mixed and matched, and dressed up with accents.

Panels and squares- Offer design versatility mixed with easy locking installation.

Linoleum comes in a wide variety of colors, from earthy neutrals to bright reds, blues, greens, purples and yellows. The color is not just a coating but is fully integrated into the material and runs all the way through it.

Underlayment. With proper prep, linoleum can be installed over virtually any flat, dry, clean surface. In most cases, a plywood underlayment is recommended for the best results.